2017/10/20

[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Font for Your Book


Fonts, an important part of publishing any paperback book.  So which fonts should you choose?

When desktop publishing started, way back in the 1980s, computers' were able to graphics that were more accurate, sort of "what you see is what you get" kind of display.  Creating familiar fonts for computer users all over the world.

Times New Roman and Arial are the most popular of these fonts, but they're a bit of a mixed bag for all creators and customers alike.

These fonts have been set to "default", spreading everywhere whether they're appropriate or not.

The Dilemma with Defaults

Times New Roman was designed in 1931 by Stanley Morrison for use in the Times London Newspaper.

Original designed to be read in a newspaper its set width and other internal properties were always determined to be read in the confines of a newspaper, but not in the generous space of a book.

One of the most popular fonts of recent times is Arial, whose origins come from the font Helvetica.  They only typeface to have a movie made about it.  Not intended for readers unused to seeing whole books set in sans serif fonts.

Better Graphics, Better Fonts

Fortunately technology has moved on and become more sophisticated and so has it users.  There has been a massive explosion in new fonts from new designers.

A lot of these fonts are based on the older designs dating back as far as the late 15th century.

This is where the family of "oldstyle" comes from.

Identifying Oldstyle Fonts

Calligraphers and scribes, before the invention of printing, would use these fonts by writing them out by hand.

These "Oldstyle" fonts have the kind of characteristics perfect for book composition.

They can be easily identified by their characteristics:

Tilted axis

Round letters like "O" and "C" have both thicker and thinner strokes.  They a tilted axis, if you drew a line threough them they would be slightly off-center.  Emulating the square-tipped pen the scribes would use.

Moderate stroke variation

No huge variation on the thin and thick strokes, they don't tend to vary that much.  They were also written with square-tipped pens creating a variable stroke with each character.

Rounded or bracketed serifs

Serifs have strokes like the "legs" on an "i" or they make letters look more decorative.  The scribes would leave a tiny flourish after each stroke.  They make words more readable.

Best Fonts For Paperback Books

Garamond

A classic oldstyle font created by Claude Garamond in the 16th century France.  Many other similar typefaces have been created including the popular Sabon.

Caslon

This font derived from William Caslon, one England,s first printers.  A very good choice for book publishers.

Janson Text

Emanating from the Netherlands in the 17th century.

Palatino

The most popular oldstyle font off all time is Palatino.  A hugely over-exposed font, a font used by Mackintosh, back in the day.

Which Font Should I use?

If you have real flair for design then you'll have no problem matching up your font with your book design.

Typesetting with a PC won't give you the sophisticated hyphenation or elegant control over your type.

By choosing the right typeface at the start, you'll create a more readable book and also accomodate book publishing practices.

Read more about writing: The Benefits of Writing on HubpagesDiscover the Websites that Pay Writer's $50+How to Write About What Your Love and Get PaidA Simple Guide to Writing an Article in 30 mins or Less

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.


2017/10/18

Selecting the Right Kindle


Core Features of Amazon Kindle

Books can only be purchased from Amazon
All Amazon Prime members have access to Kindle Owners' Lending Library
Prime members also have access to Prime Reading Service
Access to Amazon's Family Library (which means you can share your eBooks with other members of your household

Which Model Should I Choose?

Budget Kindle starting at $79.99



Comes with:
  • 6" touchscreen
  • 1GHz processor
  • 4GB of storage
  • Two weeks battery life per charge


Kindle Paperwhite from $119.99




  • Optional 3G connectivity
  • 300 pixels per inch
  • Available in Wi-Fi
  • Available without lockscreen adverts with 3G $170


Kindle Voyage from $199.99




  • Thinner and light with PagePress buttons and ambient light sensor
  • Choose between Wi-Fi or 3G
  • 6" touchscreen
  • 300 pixles per inch
  • Use PagePress to turn pages
  • Six weeks battery life is used for half an hour a day with wireless off and screen lighting set to 10
  • Ambient light sensor, adjust automatically to the lightning conditions


Kindle Oasis from $249.99





  • 3G version
  • Waterproof
  • The lightest of all other Kindles weighing in at 131g without its case
  • Battery last a couple of weeks
  • Included case boosts battery life by up to two months
  • Now with Audible, listen to the world's largest library of audiobooks
  • 300 pixels per inch
  • Front lit with more LEDs


Best overall Kindle

First eReaders should opt for the basic Kindle, but a worthless buy for those wanting a better upgrade.  The Kindle Paperwhite comes out the best choice and value, with its touchscreen and light, for anyone wanting to upgrade their old Kindle.

For those avid Kindle eReaders the Kindle Oasis is the best choice, if you're looking for the best model it comes out on top.

Read more about writing: The Benefits of Writing on HubpagesDiscover the Websites that Pay Writer's $50+How to Write About What Your Love and Get PaidA Simple Guide to Writing an Article in 30 mins or Less

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

2017/10/16

[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Book Size


Once you've published your ebook you may want to start looking into creating a paperback book. You to start thinking about things like 'trime size' and whether you should use creme or white paper.

But don't panic! I'm going to give you some helpful pointers for you to understand what everything means, so you can get your paperback started.

What is the 'Trim Size'?
The 'trim size' refers actual size of the book which has been trimmed down and bound at the printer.


There are various 'trim sizes' depending upon whether your book is fiction or non-fiction, includes photographs or images or category your book falls into. For example:

Mass Market

These books have to 4-1/4" x 7".Books sold through supermarkets, airports, drugstores etc., their size is part of their appeal and the way they're distributed. Not usually self-published books.

Trade Paperbacks

These books have to be 5-1/2" x 8-1/2" to 6". Most self-published books are 6" x 9" trade paperbacks.

Manuals and Workbooks


These books are larger, 8" x 10" to 8-1/2" x 11. Usually used for instructional books and directories with detailed drawings and graphics.

Novels

Usually smaller sizes 5-1/2" x 8-1/2" most popular size. You can also find memoirs in this category and published in a similar size.

General Non-Fiction

These books are usually 6" x 9", one of the most popular sizes. Also widely used for hardback books.

Art and Photography Books

These books have no particular size to conform to. They can be big heavy books or very small. Photographers prefer a more square or nearly square shaped book.

Trim Sizes and Production

Print on demand distribution leaves you with limited sizes and choices. Here are the most popular sizes used by some of the biggest publishers.

Lightning Source

Black and White
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (198 x 129 mm)
5 x 8 inches, (203 x 127 mm)
5.25 x 8 inches, (203 x 133 mm)
5.83 x 8.27 inches, (210 x 148 mm)
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 140 mm)
6 x 9 inches, (229 x 152 mm)
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (234 x 156 mm)
7.50 x 9.25 inches, (235 x 191 mm)
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (244 x 170 mm)
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (246 x 189 mm)
7 x 10 inches, (254 x 178 mm)
8 x 10 inches, (254 x 203 mm)
8.25 x 11 inches, (280 x 210 mm)
8.5 x 11 inches, (280 x 216 mm)
8.268 x 11.693 (A4) inches, (297 x 210 mm)

Standard Colour
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (198 x 129 mm)
5 x 8 inches, (203 x 127 mm)
5.25 x 8 inches, (203 x 133 mm)
5.83 x 8.27 inches, (210 x 148 mm)
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 140 mm)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 216 mm)
6 x 9 inches, (229 x 152 mm)
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (234 x 156 mm)
7.50 x 9.25 inches, (235 x 191 mm)
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (244 x 170 mm)
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (246 x 189 mm)
7 x 10 inches, (254 x 178 mm)
8 x 10 inches, (254 x 203 mm)
8.25 x 11 inches, (280 x 210 mm)
8.5 x 11 inches, (280 x 216 mm)
8.268 x 11.693 (A4) inches, (297 x 210 mm)

Premium Colour
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 140 mm)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 216 mm)
6 x 9 inches, (229 x 152 mm)
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (234 x 156 mm)
7 x 10 inches, (254 x 178 mm)
8 x 10 inches, (254 x 203 mm)
8.5 x 11 inches, (280 x 216 mm)

CreateSpace

Full-colour interior books:
5 x 8 inches, (12.7 x 20.32 centimetres)*
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (12.9 x 19.8 centimetres)
5.25 x 8 inches, (13.335 x 20.32 centimetres)
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (13.97 x 21.59 centimetres)
6 x 9 inches, (15.24 x 22.86 centimetres)*
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (15.6 x 23.4 centimetres)*
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (17 x 24.4 centimetres)
7 x 10 inches, (17.78 x 25.4 centimetres)*
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (18.9 x 24.6 centimetres)
7.5 x 9.25 inches, (19.1 x 23.5 centimetres)
8 x 10 inches, (20.32 x 25.4 centimetres)*
8.25 x 6 inches, (20.955 x 15.24 centimetres)
8.25 x 8.25 inches, (20.955 x 20.955 centimetres)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (21.59 x 21.59 centimetres)*
8.5 x 11 inches, (21.59 x 27.94 centimetres)*

Black and white interior books:
5 x 8 inches, (12.7 x 20.32 centimetres)*
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (12.9 x 19.8 centimetres)*
5.25 x 8 inches, (13.335 x 20.32 centimetres)*
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (13.97 x 21.59 centimetres)*
6 x 9 inches, (15.24 x 22.86 centimetres)*
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (15.6 x 23.4 centimetres)*
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (17 x 24.4 centimetres)*
7 x 10 inches, (17.78 x 25.4 centimetres)*
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (18.9 x 24.6 centimetres)*
7.5 x 9.25 inches, (19.1 x 23.5 centimetres)*
8 x 10 inches, (20.32 x 25.4 centimetres)*
8.25 x 6 inches, (20.955 x 15.24 centimetres)
8.25 x 8.25 inches, (20.955 x 20.955 centimetres)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (21.59 x 21.59 centimetres)
8.5 x 11 inches, (21.59 x 27.94 centimetres)*

Many of the above sizes are "industry standards" so can be found with Createspace and Lightning Sources.

Blurb

5 x 8 in. (13 x 20 cm)
6 x 9 in. (15 x 23 cm)
7 x 7 in. (18 x 18 cm)
8 x 10 in. (20 x 25 cm)
10 x 8 in. (25 x 20 cm)
12 x 12 in. (30 x 30 cm)
13 x 11 in. (33 x 28 cm)

Lulu

Black and white only
5.5 x 8.5 in. (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
4.25 x 6.87 in. (10.79 x 17.45 cm)

Full-colour only
12.75 x 10.75 in. (32.39 x 27.31 cm)
12 x 12 in. (30 x 30 cm)

Black and white or full-colour books
8.5 x 11 in. (21.59 x 27.94 cm)
5.83 x 8.26 in. (A5) (14.81 x 20.98 cm)
6 x 9 in. (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
6.13 x 9.21 in. (15.6 x 23.4 cm)
6.625 x 10.25 in. (16.83 x 26.04 cm)
7.44 x 9.68 in. (18.9 x 24.59 cm)
7.5 x 7.5 in. (19 x 19 cm)
8.26 x 11.69 in. (A4) (20.98 x 29.69 cm)
8.5 x 8.5 in. (21.59 x 21.59 cm)
9 x 7 in. (22.86 x 17.78 cm)
8.25 x 10.75 in. (20.96 x 27.31 cm)

Things to Consider When Choosing Paper

A good choice for non-fiction, novels and memoirs would be creme coloured paper. It's kinder on the eyes when being read for long-stretches.

CreateSpace and Lightning Source both offer creme paper in sizes 5.25″ x 8″, 5.5″ x 8.5″, or 6″ x 9″. Any other sizes only offer white paper.

What is a Good Size for My Book?

The most commonly used sizes for self-publishers are 5-1/2″ x 8-1/2″ or 6″ x 9". These sizes work for a lot of different kinds of books. If your book falls into the above categories, then you'll have no problems with these sizes. If you're finding it difficult you need to:

Choose a different size if:

your book falls into a different category, such as a workbook
if your book needs a larger size for functional reasons
you want to stand out in your chosen category

Read more about writing: The Benefits of Writing on HubpagesDiscover the Websites that Pay Writer's $50+How to Write About What Your Love and Get PaidA Simple Guide to Writing an Article in 30 mins or Less

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

2017/10/13

6 Useful Things to Know About Social Media


I've been looking into social media more deeply these days and this is what I've discovered.

1. Social Media is all about Community

A term much used these days, can also be a little too vague at times.

For writer's this term refers to the community of your readers, other writer's that follow you and the publisher's in your community.

Nobody owns or has control over a community, but engaging with one is vital.  Being recognised enough to be respected and trusted is a good sign of your authority within that community.

2. People don't respond to author's who only use social media for their own ends

Your success will be limited with this ham handed approach.

3. Social Media Makes You More Creative

Many people see social media as a marketing tool, while this is certainly true, it can also be seen as a creative medium.  With some skillful research, design and writing your updates can be more meaningful.

4. Have Fun With It

All of the creative joy gets sucked out of it if you feel like you have to do it.  People will feel that and move away from your social media posts.  Try adding some substance and insight when you post.

5. More Readers More Freedom

The more you can reach out to your readers, through your newsletter, website or social media, the less time you need to spend looking at other more expensive options.

6. Experiment and Find Your Own Way

Everyone has their own ideas about how they should use social media, there aren't any rules other than good principles and best practises.

So don't take it too seriously and relax, social media isn't just about you it's about your audience too.

Read more: How to Start a Blogger Blog and Make MoneyThe Simple and Quick Guide to Starting Your Own WebsiteBlogger Basics.

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

2017/10/11

10 Curious Workplaces of Famous Writers


Writers great and small have found creativity and solace in many weird and wonderful places over the years.  Many literary geniuses have gone beyond the humble desk and chair to create their ideal writing spots.  Instead opting for a bathtub or hike into the wilderness.  I present you with 10 of the most memorable.

MI5 Officer John le Carré spent many hours writing on his long train rides between Buckinghamshire to London composing his debut novel Call for the Dead.

Oliver Twist creator Charles Dickens had his desk and all its contents shipped to his vacation home.

The seat of a Model T Ford was the perfect writing place for Gertrude Stein.  Shopping excursions around Paris with her partner Alice B. Toklas were particularly productive for this writer.

The shade of tree was good enough for D.H. Lawrence, resting on pine trees in New Mexico to the Black Forest in Germany.  Considering his proclivity, Lawrence noted, "The trees are like living company".

While renovating her mansion Agatha Christie instructed her architect "I want a big bath, and I need a ledge because I like to eat apples".  Composing her plots in her Victorian tub nibbling on an apple.

Edith Wharton wrote her manuscripts in bed, resting in between her covers with her dog next to her and an ink pot by one arm.  A pile of papers would appear, which would be later retrieved by her maid for the secretary to type.

A clean white desk, a typewriter and a small window in a private place, was enough for George Bernard Shaw.

Wallace Stevens would walk 2.5 miles to the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Co., composing poetry between his doorstep and the office door.

A small publishing company was started by Virginia Woolf and her husband Leonard in 1917.  Despite this new enterprise Woolf continued to write.  Walking down to the basement every morning, passing the printing press and into a storage room where she would sit, pen in hand, in her cosy old armchair to write.

Dame Edith Sitwell would start her day's writing lying in a coffin, strange as it may seem this eccentric poet found inspiration for her work.

Read More:
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