Monday, October 30, 2017

The Fast Guide to Publishing Your Book with Createspace


When I first started looking into self-publishing my books on paper, I was really intimidated and had no clue about the simple process of adding my PDF files to the CreateSpace dashboard.  I'm going to give you a quick step-by-step guide to uploading your book and cover as well as information I use to format my documents and make a basic manuscript ready to upload.

Formatting Your Document

I did a lot of experimentation and researching before I go my margins and font to where I needed them.

  • Book Type = Non-Fiction 
  • Size = 6" x 9"
  • Document Size = A5
  • Font = Garamond
  • Font size = Book Title 18, Headings 14 Bold, Main body = 12
  • Margins = 2.5 cm
  • Header/Footer = 1.5 cm

Creating Your Paperback Book with CreateSpace

1. Sign up with CreateSpace.

2. Click Add New Title button.  You'll be taken to Start New Project Page.

3. Start Your New Project page, simply fill in the name of your book.  Choose setup method.

Guided: For new publishers to the process.
Expert: A single-page process for publishers already familiar with the process.

4. Click Get Started.

Title Information Page: Simply fill in your:

  • Book Title
  • Subtitle (if you have one)
  • Author name
  • Contributors
  • Series Name
  • Number (if applicable)

If you leave the Publication Date blank the date your book is published on CreateSpace will be filled in, if you published it previously with Kindle or a traditional publisher you can use the original publish date.

5. Click Save and Continue.

ISBN number:  All books require an ISBN number.  You have four options:

  • Free CreateSpace Assigned ISBN
  • Custom ISBN
  • Custom Universal ISBN
  • Provide Your Own ISBN

I used the Free ISBN option.  You can always purchase your own ISBN through a company such as Nielsen or Bowker.

6. Choose then click Continue.

Interior:  Your Choices are:
  • Black & White or colour
  • Paper colour (white or cream)
  • Trim Size is 6" x 9" - trade paperback
7. Uploading Your Book and Cover

I converted my document file to PDF, and did the same thing to my cover image.

Cover Image

With all of my books I went right back to basics and kept my designs and colours very simple.  My thought was that I can improve on the cover later on, plus doing it on a shoestring you need to start somewhere.

CreateSpace offers various services for editing and professional cover design, this services start from about $349.

Once you've uploaded your cover, you can then go into cover creator and edit your image and book cover accordingly. It allows you to add information on the back cover.

8. Finishing Setup:  You can review your formatted document and book cover as you go through each step.

9. Review:  CreateSpace automatically review your work and make sure your book matches up with their standards.  Don't panic if your book isn't up to scratch.  Do your research, if it doesn't meet their standards.  You'll get there eventually.

10. Distribution Channels: Once your book has been accepted you can start setting up the Distribution Channels and pricing.

11. Pricing:  You can use the calculator to determine how much you'll receive in royalties.  It's worth seeing what other authors have done in your chose subject though first.

12. Description:  Add your description to your sales page.  Appoint a BISAC category, set language, country of publication, choose your keywords, check adult content if applicable.

If you feel really unsure, contact the CreateSpace support team.  They'll get back to you pretty quickly and give you the help you need, they're really attentive and want to hear any queries.

Don't be afraid to take the leap and publish your book on paper!

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

6 Essential Points for Proofreading


Before you publish any document or publication, proofreading is your best safeguard against typing errors and mistakes made in grammar and punctuation.

Before the document is laid out check for tone, grammar, syntax, usage and style.  Here are some important steps you can use to aid in your proofread:

✢Apply a Checklist

Organize a list of valuable thinks to look out for, for example areas like agreement nouns and verbs and of pronouns, antecedents and number style.

Check for Factual Accuracy

Go over your facts, figures and proper names rigorously.  If you're inserting at the last minute make sure the information is highlighted so that you remember where to put it in your document.

Verbalise Your Document

Errors become more visible when your text is read out loud.

Target One Line at a Time

Use a ruler to cover the text following the line you are proofreading, moving the ruler down as you go.  This helps your eyes to focus on one line of text at a time and stops you from reading too quickly.

Check Format is Correct

If you have specified format to follow, make sure your document complies with the instructions you've been given.  Making sure page numbering, alignment, fonts, sizes and headlines are all within the parameters you've been given.

Repeat Your Proofread

Go over the revisions you've made, go over the document with a fine tooth comb and thoroughness, instead of just a quick spot-check.  You may have missed something.

Read More:
This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Monday, October 23, 2017

[Self-Publishing] The Phenomena of the Blank Page


Having blank pages in a book can seem really weird at times, but its not something that we think about that often.  Buy or borrow any hardcover or paperback and you'll stumble across blank pages in the front or back of the book.

Why is this? You might ask.

According to publishers it's to do with signatures, which is just industry spiel for groups of pages that printers cut to assemble a book.  You can have as many as four blank pages.  If the manuscript it 200 pages it may be a perfect fit.  An uneven number like 203 means there's more likely to be pages leftover from the signatures.

Design Observation

Many book designers will offset this expense by playing around with character spacing.  This is called kerning, by simply reducing the space between two specific characters throughout a book, can add up to an entire saved page.

Filling in the space

Many publishers prefer to fill that unused space with checklists of the author's work, portions from other books, illustrations.  Non-fiction publications such as manuals and textbooks may add the phrase "This page is intentionally left blank", to alert the reader that they're not missing any necessary information.

Some author's request blank pages in their books, to keep in line with tradition.

Read more about writing: Publishing a Book: A Quick Examination of Self-Publishing and PublishingWhat is DRM? How Does it Work?The Fast Guide to Publishing Your Book with Createspace[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Font for Your Book[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Book SizeThings to Do Before You Self-Publish Your Ebook.

Friday, October 20, 2017

[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Font for Your Book


Fonts, an important part of publishing any paperback book.  So which fonts should you choose?

When desktop publishing started, way back in the 1980s, computers' were able to graphics that were more accurate, sort of "what you see is what you get" kind of display.  Creating familiar fonts for computer users all over the world.

Times New Roman and Arial are the most popular of these fonts, but they're a bit of a mixed bag for all creators and customers alike.

These fonts have been set to "default", spreading everywhere whether they're appropriate or not.

The Dilemma with Defaults

Times New Roman was designed in 1931 by Stanley Morrison for use in the Times London Newspaper.

Original designed to be read in a newspaper its set width and other internal properties were always determined to be read in the confines of a newspaper, but not in the generous space of a book.

One of the most popular fonts of recent times is Arial, whose origins come from the font Helvetica.  They only typeface to have a movie made about it.  Not intended for readers unused to seeing whole books set in sans serif fonts.

Better Graphics, Better Fonts

Fortunately technology has moved on and become more sophisticated and so has it users.  There has been a massive explosion in new fonts from new designers.

A lot of these fonts are based on the older designs dating back as far as the late 15th century.

This is where the family of "oldstyle" comes from.

Identifying Oldstyle Fonts

Calligraphers and scribes, before the invention of printing, would use these fonts by writing them out by hand.

These "Oldstyle" fonts have the kind of characteristics perfect for book composition.

They can be easily identified by their characteristics:

Tilted axis

Round letters like "O" and "C" have both thicker and thinner strokes.  They a tilted axis, if you drew a line threough them they would be slightly off-center.  Emulating the square-tipped pen the scribes would use.

Moderate stroke variation

No huge variation on the thin and thick strokes, they don't tend to vary that much.  They were also written with square-tipped pens creating a variable stroke with each character.

Rounded or bracketed serifs

Serifs have strokes like the "legs" on an "i" or they make letters look more decorative.  The scribes would leave a tiny flourish after each stroke.  They make words more readable.

Best Fonts For Paperback Books

Garamond

A classic oldstyle font created by Claude Garamond in the 16th century France.  Many other similar typefaces have been created including the popular Sabon.

Caslon

This font derived from William Caslon, one England,s first printers.  A very good choice for book publishers.

Janson Text

Emanating from the Netherlands in the 17th century.

Palatino

The most popular oldstyle font off all time is Palatino.  A hugely over-exposed font, a font used by Mackintosh, back in the day.

Which Font Should I use?

If you have real flair for design then you'll have no problem matching up your font with your book design.

Typesetting with a PC won't give you the sophisticated hyphenation or elegant control over your type.

By choosing the right typeface at the start, you'll create a more readable book and also accomodate book publishing practices.

Read more about writing: Publishing a Book: A Quick Examination of Self-Publishing and PublishingWhat is DRM? How Does it Work?The Fast Guide to Publishing Your Book with Createspace[Self-Publishing] The Phenomena of the Blank Page[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Book SizeThings to Do Before You Self-Publish Your Ebook.

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.


Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Selecting the Right Kindle


Core Features of Amazon Kindle
  • Books can only be purchased from Amazon 
  • All Amazon Prime members have access to Kindle Owners' Lending Library
  • Prime members also have access to Prime Reading Service
  • Access to Amazon's Family Library (which means you can share your eBooks with other members of your household


Which Model Should I Choose?

Budget Kindle starting at $79.99



Comes with:
  • 6" touchscreen
  • 1GHz processor
  • 4GB of storage
  • Two weeks battery life per charge


Kindle Paperwhite from $119.99




  • Optional 3G connectivity
  • 300 pixels per inch
  • Available in Wi-Fi
  • Available without lockscreen adverts with 3G $170


Kindle Voyage from $199.99




  • Thinner and light with PagePress buttons and ambient light sensor
  • Choose between Wi-Fi or 3G
  • 6" touchscreen
  • 300 pixles per inch
  • Use PagePress to turn pages
  • Six weeks battery life is used for half an hour a day with wireless off and screen lighting set to 10
  • Ambient light sensor, adjust automatically to the lightning conditions


Kindle Oasis from $249.99





  • 3G version
  • Waterproof
  • The lightest of all other Kindles weighing in at 131g without its case
  • Battery last a couple of weeks
  • Included case boosts battery life by up to two months
  • Now with Audible, listen to the world's largest library of audiobooks
  • 300 pixels per inch
  • Front lit with more LEDs


Best overall Kindle

First eReaders should opt for the basic Kindle, but a worthless buy for those wanting a better upgrade.  The Kindle Paperwhite comes out the best choice and value, with its touchscreen and light, for anyone wanting to upgrade their old Kindle.

For those avid Kindle eReaders the Kindle Oasis is the best choice, if you're looking for the best model it comes out on top.

Read more about writing: The Benefits of Writing on HubpagesDiscover the Websites that Pay Writer's $50+How to Write About What Your Love and Get PaidA Simple Guide to Writing an Article in 30 mins or Less

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Monday, October 16, 2017

[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Book Size


Once you've published your ebook you may want to start looking into creating a paperback book. You to start thinking about things like 'trime size' and whether you should use creme or white paper.

But don't panic! I'm going to give you some helpful pointers for you to understand what everything means, so you can get your paperback started.

What is the 'Trim Size'?

The 'trim size' refers actual size of the book which has been trimmed down and bound at the printer.

There are various 'trim sizes' depending upon whether your book is fiction or non-fiction, includes photographs or images or category your book falls into. For example:

Mass Market

These books have to 4-1/4" x 7".Books sold through supermarkets, airports, drugstores etc., their size is part of their appeal and the way they're distributed. Not usually self-published books.

Trade Paperbacks

These books have to be 5-1/2" x 8-1/2" to 6". Most self-published books are 6" x 9" trade paperbacks.

Manuals and Workbooks


These books are larger, 8" x 10" to 8-1/2" x 11. Usually used for instructional books and directories with detailed drawings and graphics.

Novels

Usually smaller sizes 5-1/2" x 8-1/2" most popular size. You can also find memoirs in this category and published in a similar size.

General Non-Fiction

These books are usually 6" x 9", one of the most popular sizes. Also widely used for hardback books.

Art and Photography Books

These books have no particular size to conform to. They can be big heavy books or very small. Photographers prefer a more square or nearly square shaped book.

Trim Sizes and Production

Print on demand distribution leaves you with limited sizes and choices. Here are the most popular sizes used by some of the biggest publishers.

Lightning Source

Black and White
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (198 x 129 mm)
5 x 8 inches, (203 x 127 mm)
5.25 x 8 inches, (203 x 133 mm)
5.83 x 8.27 inches, (210 x 148 mm)
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 140 mm)
6 x 9 inches, (229 x 152 mm)
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (234 x 156 mm)
7.50 x 9.25 inches, (235 x 191 mm)
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (244 x 170 mm)
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (246 x 189 mm)
7 x 10 inches, (254 x 178 mm)
8 x 10 inches, (254 x 203 mm)
8.25 x 11 inches, (280 x 210 mm)
8.5 x 11 inches, (280 x 216 mm)
8.268 x 11.693 (A4) inches, (297 x 210 mm)

Standard Colour
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (198 x 129 mm)
5 x 8 inches, (203 x 127 mm)
5.25 x 8 inches, (203 x 133 mm)
5.83 x 8.27 inches, (210 x 148 mm)
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 140 mm)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 216 mm)
6 x 9 inches, (229 x 152 mm)
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (234 x 156 mm)
7.50 x 9.25 inches, (235 x 191 mm)
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (244 x 170 mm)
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (246 x 189 mm)
7 x 10 inches, (254 x 178 mm)
8 x 10 inches, (254 x 203 mm)
8.25 x 11 inches, (280 x 210 mm)
8.5 x 11 inches, (280 x 216 mm)
8.268 x 11.693 (A4) inches, (297 x 210 mm)

Premium Colour
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 140 mm)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (216 x 216 mm)
6 x 9 inches, (229 x 152 mm)
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (234 x 156 mm)
7 x 10 inches, (254 x 178 mm)
8 x 10 inches, (254 x 203 mm)
8.5 x 11 inches, (280 x 216 mm)

CreateSpace

Full-colour interior books:
5 x 8 inches, (12.7 x 20.32 centimetres)*
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (12.9 x 19.8 centimetres)
5.25 x 8 inches, (13.335 x 20.32 centimetres)
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (13.97 x 21.59 centimetres)
6 x 9 inches, (15.24 x 22.86 centimetres)*
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (15.6 x 23.4 centimetres)*
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (17 x 24.4 centimetres)
7 x 10 inches, (17.78 x 25.4 centimetres)*
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (18.9 x 24.6 centimetres)
7.5 x 9.25 inches, (19.1 x 23.5 centimetres)
8 x 10 inches, (20.32 x 25.4 centimetres)*
8.25 x 6 inches, (20.955 x 15.24 centimetres)
8.25 x 8.25 inches, (20.955 x 20.955 centimetres)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (21.59 x 21.59 centimetres)*
8.5 x 11 inches, (21.59 x 27.94 centimetres)*

Black and white interior books:
5 x 8 inches, (12.7 x 20.32 centimetres)*
5.06 x 7.81 inches, (12.9 x 19.8 centimetres)*
5.25 x 8 inches, (13.335 x 20.32 centimetres)*
5.5 x 8.5 inches, (13.97 x 21.59 centimetres)*
6 x 9 inches, (15.24 x 22.86 centimetres)*
6.14 x 9.21 inches, (15.6 x 23.4 centimetres)*
6.69 x 9.61 inches, (17 x 24.4 centimetres)*
7 x 10 inches, (17.78 x 25.4 centimetres)*
7.44 x 9.69 inches, (18.9 x 24.6 centimetres)*
7.5 x 9.25 inches, (19.1 x 23.5 centimetres)*
8 x 10 inches, (20.32 x 25.4 centimetres)*
8.25 x 6 inches, (20.955 x 15.24 centimetres)
8.25 x 8.25 inches, (20.955 x 20.955 centimetres)
8.5 x 8.5 inches, (21.59 x 21.59 centimetres)
8.5 x 11 inches, (21.59 x 27.94 centimetres)*

Many of the above sizes are "industry standards" so can be found with Createspace and Lightning Sources.

Blurb

5 x 8 in. (13 x 20 cm)
6 x 9 in. (15 x 23 cm)
7 x 7 in. (18 x 18 cm)
8 x 10 in. (20 x 25 cm)
10 x 8 in. (25 x 20 cm)
12 x 12 in. (30 x 30 cm)
13 x 11 in. (33 x 28 cm)

Lulu

Black and white only
5.5 x 8.5 in. (13.97 x 21.59 cm)
4.25 x 6.87 in. (10.79 x 17.45 cm)

Full-colour only
12.75 x 10.75 in. (32.39 x 27.31 cm)
12 x 12 in. (30 x 30 cm)

Black and white or full-colour books
8.5 x 11 in. (21.59 x 27.94 cm)
5.83 x 8.26 in. (A5) (14.81 x 20.98 cm)
6 x 9 in. (15.24 x 22.86 cm)
6.13 x 9.21 in. (15.6 x 23.4 cm)
6.625 x 10.25 in. (16.83 x 26.04 cm)
7.44 x 9.68 in. (18.9 x 24.59 cm)
7.5 x 7.5 in. (19 x 19 cm)
8.26 x 11.69 in. (A4) (20.98 x 29.69 cm)
8.5 x 8.5 in. (21.59 x 21.59 cm)
9 x 7 in. (22.86 x 17.78 cm)
8.25 x 10.75 in. (20.96 x 27.31 cm)

Things to Consider When Choosing Paper

A good choice for non-fiction, novels and memoirs would be creme coloured paper. It's kinder on the eyes when being read for long-stretches.

CreateSpace and Lightning Source both offer creme paper in sizes 5.25″ x 8″, 5.5″ x 8.5″, or 6″ x 9″. Any other sizes only offer white paper.

What is a Good Size for My Book?

The most commonly used sizes for self-publishers are 5-1/2″ x 8-1/2″ or 6″ x 9". These sizes work for a lot of different kinds of books. If your book falls into the above categories, then you'll have no problems with these sizes. If you're finding it difficult you need to:

Choose a different size if:

your book falls into a different category, such as a workbook
if your book needs a larger size for functional reasons
you want to stand out in your chosen category

Read more about writing: Publishing a Book: A Quick Examination of Self-Publishing and PublishingWhat is DRM? How Does it Work?The Fast Guide to Publishing Your Book with Createspace[Self-Publishing] The Phenomena of the Blank Page[Self-Publishing] Selecting a Font for Your BookThings to Do Before You Self-Publish Your Ebook.


This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Friday, October 13, 2017

6 Useful Things to Know About Social Media


I've been looking into social media more deeply these days and this is what I've discovered.

1. Social Media is all about Community

A term much used these days, can also be a little too vague at times.

For writer's this term refers to the community of your readers, other writer's that follow you and the publisher's in your community.

Nobody owns or has control over a community, but engaging with one is vital.  Being recognised enough to be respected and trusted is a good sign of your authority within that community.

2. People don't respond to author's who only use social media for their own ends

Your success will be limited with this ham handed approach.

3. Social Media Makes You More Creative

Many people see social media as a marketing tool, while this is certainly true, it can also be seen as a creative medium.  With some skillful research, design and writing your updates can be more meaningful.

4. Have Fun With It

All of the creative joy gets sucked out of it if you feel like you have to do it.  People will feel that and move away from your social media posts.  Try adding some substance and insight when you post.

5. More Readers More Freedom

The more you can reach out to your readers, through your newsletter, website or social media, the less time you need to spend looking at other more expensive options.

6. Experiment and Find Your Own Way

Everyone has their own ideas about how they should use social media, there aren't any rules other than good principles and best practises.

So don't take it too seriously and relax, social media isn't just about you it's about your audience too.

Read more about Social Media: The Really Quick Guide to Social MediaLinkCollider: How it's Different from Other SEO Tools and Why You Should Use it6 Useful Things to Know About Social MediaWhat is SEMrush?

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

10 Curious Workplaces of Famous Writers


Writers great and small have found creativity and solace in many weird and wonderful places over the years.  Many literary geniuses have gone beyond the humble desk and chair to create their ideal writing spots.  Instead opting for a bathtub or hike into the wilderness.  I present you with 10 of the most memorable.

MI5 Officer John le Carré spent many hours writing on his long train rides between Buckinghamshire to London composing his debut novel Call for the Dead.

Oliver Twist creator Charles Dickens had his desk and all its contents shipped to his vacation home.

The seat of a Model T Ford was the perfect writing place for Gertrude Stein.  Shopping excursions around Paris with her partner Alice B. Toklas were particularly productive for this writer.

The shade of tree was good enough for D.H. Lawrence, resting on pine trees in New Mexico to the Black Forest in Germany.  Considering his proclivity, Lawrence noted, "The trees are like living company".

While renovating her mansion Agatha Christie instructed her architect "I want a big bath, and I need a ledge because I like to eat apples".  Composing her plots in her Victorian tub nibbling on an apple.

Edith Wharton wrote her manuscripts in bed, resting in between her covers with her dog next to her and an ink pot by one arm.  A pile of papers would appear, which would be later retrieved by her maid for the secretary to type.

A clean white desk, a typewriter and a small window in a private place, was enough for George Bernard Shaw.

Wallace Stevens would walk 2.5 miles to the Hartford Accident and Indemnity Co., composing poetry between his doorstep and the office door.

A small publishing company was started by Virginia Woolf and her husband Leonard in 1917.  Despite this new enterprise Woolf continued to write.  Walking down to the basement every morning, passing the printing press and into a storage room where she would sit, pen in hand, in her cosy old armchair to write.

Dame Edith Sitwell would start her day's writing lying in a coffin, strange as it may seem this eccentric poet found inspiration for her work.

Read More:
This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Monday, October 09, 2017

Becoming a Ghostwriter


The World of Ghostwriting

Many well known authors live a double life, one under their real name and one as a ghostwriter.

You may well ask, why do they ghostwrite?  The obvious and true answer is, the money, being paid a fair rate for their much needed skill as a writer.  Sounds crazy in a time when authors are struggling to earn a decent crust from book sales.  Journalists can also be counted in amongst so many other writer's as viewing ghostwriting as a career choice.  Many magazines and publications are halving their running costs by getting rid of staff, the book industry requires reliable writer's to yield manuscripts quickly, or gather information from a celebrity in order to write their life story.  Ghostwriting is more than just celebrities and memoirs its full of lots of opportunities if you know where to look.

Ghostwriters can be found in fiction, from H.P. Lovecraft to Raymond Benson (Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell).  Fictional writing takes time to perfect, and that doesn't happen overnight.

Apart from the money a ghostwritten book is quick to research.  You usually don't work alone, gleaning all your information from your client, so you need to be gracious while you're earning every cent.

Who Needs a Ghostwriter?

Literary and entertainment agents are always on the look out for ghostwriter's.  A helping hand may be required by a writer to sell their manuscript to a publisher.  Book proposals play a significant part in the ghostwriter's work.

Qualities Required in a Good Ghostwriter

You need really strong writing skills to be a good ghostwriter.

Time keeping is also vital, deadlines need to be met on time at all times.  There'll always be someone in the background with their eye on the clock before they give a ghostwriter any money.  Express is often the name of the game when it comes to ghostwritten books.

They make sure you earn every cent of what you've written.

Earning trust and drawing information out of people are skills every good ghostwriter needs.  It's all fine and dandy when you get along with your client, but really difficult if you're constantly butting heads.  Respecting them enough to draw out the information you require for their book.

You need to live by your wits of you're a ghostwriter, handling massive projects, knowing what your time is worth.

Your identity disappears when you start writing for them, you're able to finish the manuscript, slipping away quietly, lips tightly sealed knowing lots of secrets.

Where to Find Ghostwriting Jobs

Start out with the people you already know in your own writing and publishing community, let them know your interested in ghostwriting work.

Try marketplaces such as Reedsy and Guru, alternatively look into self-publishing service companies and literary consultancies hire ghostwriters.

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Read more about writing: The Benefits of Writing on HubpagesDiscover the Websites that Pay Writer's $50+How to Write About What Your Love and Get PaidA Simple Guide to Writing an Article in 30 mins or Less

Friday, October 06, 2017

How and Why You Should Curate Content on Your Blog


A great way of increasing the amount of content you produce on your blog is to curate content from another website.  You can tap into current topics by adding your own personal commentary to hot topics that have been discussed on other websites.

This is a practise done by many bloggers as long as no rules aren't broken, these rules are no plagiarising content, breaking the law, publishing duplicate content and failing to credit the source.

Find out how to curate useful content on your blog in an ethical, useful and legal way.

How to Publish Editorialised Content You've Created

Before you start your content curation its important to understand the differences between content syndication, content aggregation and content curation.  Some definitions of each below:

Content Aggregation - When you bring together links to other content and provide nothing but the links in a single place, this is content aggregation.  Websites such as Alltop and PopURLs.

Content Syndication - Redistributed and aggregated content from websites such as Newstex and NewsCred are good examples of this kind of content syndication.

Content Curation - If you're reviewing an article or blog post you've read and you've gathered together the links to those sources and the descriptions, then add your own commentary, publishing it in a single location.  That's content curation.

As long as you cite and link back to the source to provide attribution you can share a variety of sources with your audience.

Produce a Weekly Round-Up Blog Post

You could use information shared by some of your favourite bloggers and do a weekly or monthly round-up.  By adding your own commentary and accrediting the original source you can add real weight and gain respect from your piers.

Embed Curated Content in Your Blog Post

You can use tools such as Storify and Rebelmouse to embed content on your blog.

Put Curated Content into an Online Video

Create a YouTube video with a single piece of curated content.  Make sure you include all of the correct links to your sources within the video.

This post contains affiliate links.  This means if you purchase through these links you are supporting 1976write and we thank you for that.

Read more: [Blog Images] How to Choose the Best Font for Your Business[Blog Images] How to Make Words Look Good[Blog Images] Pairing Your Fonts Like a Pro[Blog Images] Create Pictures with Fresh Fonts

Wednesday, October 04, 2017

The Really Quick Guide to Social Media


I've been wanting to write about social media for quite a while no, so I've put together some quick tips to help you get to grips with your social networks and how to utilise them more efficiently.

Don't Schmooze on Twitter

Something I've learned over time on Twitter is not to sell, sell, sell.  It's an easy trap to fall into and easy to do, because everyone else is doing it.  But it won't help your profile or the products you're trying to sell.

Three Ways to Connect to Other People on Twitter

Always use the 80/20 Rule

That simply means you should be retweeting 80% of other peoples content, website and blogs.  The other 20% is your own self-promotion.

My routine is posting four of my own links and retweeting about twenty to twenty five from my Twitter followers.

Start with one social media platform

If you're unsure which platform to use, start with Twitter.  Try it and see if its a good fit for your business or blog.

I went down the route of Twitter and Facebook, discovered that Facebook wasn't the platform I needed and put more energy into Twitter.

Make sure whichever platform you choose, to direct your followers to your blog, business landing page or squeeze page.  If you have a newsletter even better.

Facebook has grown up

Facebook isn't just about getting in touch with old friends, it also allows you to set up your own author, organisation or business page.

You can keep your readers up-to-date with your current events happening with your blog or business.

So:
  • Only use Facebook if you're going to keep your page up-to-date.
  • Facebook isn't Twitter.
  • Ask other people to promote you every once in a while.

Discover which platform suits you

I use Twitter and Google+ to promote my content.  Over the years I've had Pinterest and Facebook pages, but I could never get used to those platforms for self-promotion.

Social media is all about quality and timing, try using the helpful route instead of the "I'm an expert in my fieild".  There are too many experts on social media.